Blurred Vision While Wearing Contact Lenses

Simple Contacts

Ever put in your contact lenses and realize your vision is still blurry? It can be frustrating, annoying and, if persistent, a sign of a larger issue. But don’t panic yet—there are several reasons why this could be happening and they aren’t all serious.

Debris
The buildup of protein deposits and debris on your contact lenses can cause them to become cloudy or dirty, resulting in blurred vision. If your contacts are still in their wear period, thoroughly clean your lenses (wash your hands, then gently rub them with solution) and store them overnight in fresh solution (dispose of old solution and rinse out the case before storing them). If you’ve been overwearing the lenses and should have already changed them, dispose of them and start a fresh set. If the blurriness is caused by debris or buildup, these steps should solve the issue.

Dryness
Dryness of both your lenses and your eyes can also lead to blurry vision. If your eyes or contacts feel dry every once in a while, try intentionally blinking a few times, applying rewetting drops or removing and rinsing your lenses. This may be all it takes to clear up your vision. The longer you wear your lenses, the less moisture they’ll retain, so if you’re overwearing your contacts, it’s likely time to open a new pack. If you’re prone to dry eyes and experience dryness more regularly, there are over-the-counter and prescription medications to alleviate this condition. Talk to your eye doctor if you experience persistent issues with dryness—he or she may even recommend lenses specifically for chronic dry eyes, which in turn should reduce instances of blurry vision.

Change in prescription
If your contacts are fresh and your eyes aren’t dry, but you’re still experiencing persistent blurred vision, your prescription may have changed. If you suspect this is the case, book an appointment with your eye doctor as soon as possible. While blurred vision isn’t a serious issue in most cases, it can actually be an indicator of a more severe problem, like infection, cataracts or glaucoma, so when in doubt, get it checked out.